Reimagine Learning

Rochester’s Impact on the Future of Game Development

Second Avenue Learning

by Second Avenue Learning on Feb 22, 2017 12:51:10 PM

Six disruptors in the gaming industry converged at our new space in downtown Rochester to discuss the future of game design and development, and Rochester’s role as a hub for the gaming industry. The panel of industry leaders shepherd perspectives and insight into various facets of the gaming industry, from education, to game design and development, to government affairs. Those who witnessed the Games Industry Panel unfold, learned from:

Topics: RIT, Design, Games, Gaming, Game-based learning, MAGIC at RIT

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Top 5 Reasons Why Videogames Are Actually Good for Kids

Jackson Wheeler

by Jackson Wheeler on Aug 17, 2016 11:00:00 AM

Hi, I’m Jackson.

As someone who boasts an extensive resume of boss-beatings, puzzle solvings, and steely resolve in the face of the princess continually being in another castle, interning at a company that makes educational videogames has been pretty sweet. There are some who might disagree with the compatibility of education and gaming, but to me, they’ve always been necessarily intertwined.
 Here are five of my own reasons why I believe videogames are not just a worthwhile investment for entertainment’s-sake but also for their educational value.

Topics: Games, learning, Education

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Why Classroom Playtesting Sessions Are Required

Brian Regan and Victoria Van Voorhis

by Brian Regan and Victoria Van Voorhis on Feb 25, 2016 5:18:23 PM

Making videogames for a living is awesome!

I’ve helped create and shape videogames for many years now, and I don’t think I’ll ever tire of working with talented, creative people who share my passion and want nothing more than to build something that will knock your socks off. Game development can also be really, really difficult as well. One of the most challenging aspects of making a good game is the fact that, as content creators, we never actually have full control over the content once the game is done and in the hands of consumers. We build the framework and lay the ground rules, but the details are handled by the individual players.

This is a unique challenge for videogame production, as compared to other creative pursuits such as filmmaking, book-writing, or painting. Because the consumer of a game has a certain level of control over the experience, it is impossible to foresee all the possible ways in which players will interact with our games. Educational games add an additional layer of complexity, since we have to ensure players not only have fun with our games, but must retain the information as well. This leads to one of the most important questions in our field: how can we ensure our games are fun and perform well, when we cannot even begin to fathom all the different ways in which players will interact with them?

Topics: Serious Play, Games, Voters Ed, Martha Madison

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